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Taylor Swift on Sexism, Scrutiny, and taking a stand for Herself

Taylor Swift on Sexism, Scrutiny, and taking a stand for Herself

IT’S A SUNDAY AFTERNOON in Tribeca, and I’m in Taylor Swift’s loft, in a very previous publishing home that she’s restored and fortified into a sanctuary of brick, velvet, and mahogany. The room is hot and cozy and vaguely literary—later, as soon as we move across her bedroom on the way to her yard, 10 % of my mind shall think her wardrobe might start as much as Narnia. Barefoot in a wine-colored flowery top and matching flowy pants, Swift is typing passwords as a laptop computer to exhibit me the video for “You Need to Calm Down, ” eight days on the world before she unleashes it.

I’ve a sliver of an basic concept what to anticipate. 2-3 weeks earlier in the day, we invested just about every day during the movie shoot, in a field-slash-junkyard that is dusty of Los Angeles. Swift had caused it to be sort of Big Gay Candy hill trailer park, a technicolor place that is happy. The cast and team wore sunglasses—living that is heart-shaped breathing lovey-eyes emoji—and a mailbox warned, PREFER LETTERS JUST.

Swift and a blast of costars filmed six scenes over in regards to a dozen hours. The singer-songwriter Hayley Kiyoko, proven to her fans as “Lesbian Jesus, ” shot arrows at a bull’s-eye.